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Earlier this week I managed 50 miles (80km) on one charge, despite the car only showing 38m/61km before starting the journey. All completed in EL mode.
 

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Earlier this week I managed 50 miles (80km) on one charge, despite the car only showing 38m/61km before starting the journey. All completed in EL mode.

Thanks Antnee, are the 80 km inclusive of the bonus miles? The longer the distance the better the range am presuming. Never managed to get this range. Unfortunately, in Malta the distances are limited and the problem lies with heavy traffic here so I try to avoid that by commuting at quieter times.
 

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That distance is what I covered on 1 battery charge. I made it to the charger with just 1% left :cool:
 

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I have not read EVERY post on here but quite a few, and can't quite believe that not one post has mentioned the biggest factor aside from temperature - gradients! There is a mountain between me and my workplace. When I go up one side I use 4 miles of elec range for 1 mile of travel. Down the other side, my range INCREASES by 2 miles due to braking regeneration over about 4 miles of travel. Very few journeys are totally flat, and you will rarely find 1 mile of travel = 1 mile off the range. I can travel 3 miles slightly downhill before a 1 mile drop in range, and on an incline, use 3 miles up on an actual distance of 2 miles. My highest quoted range on a full charge was 50 miles, lowest was 27. I do the exact same journey to work every day. It is 46 miles. One day I can get there and back on pure electric, the next I'll have to use 5 miles of petrol. No obvious explanation, but maybe I was 5 mins late one day which meant I was doing 75mph on the motorway instead of 70. The next day ambient temp might have been 5-6 degrees cooler, again leading to a few miles difference. In June where temps were around 16-20 °C all month (about optimal for battery efficiency) I literally did not use one drop of petrol. Charged once a day costing about £1:40, so about £42 to run the car all month. Not bad really is it? Whatever your expectations of the cars electric range, it will be making your petrol engine more efficient all the time, even in sport mode. 80mpg should be minimum return you get, however you drive. I did a 150 mile journey the other day using comfort mode and putting the destination in sat nav. I arrived with 2 miles electric left, and had done ave 140mpg for the journey. No ICE car would do half that. Just try to never go on a journey with 0% battery as it will just be dead weight in the car and your mpg would plummet with the small, high revving 1.3l engine working alone.
 

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A250e Saloon Prem+ digital white
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After a month of ownership my EL range has gone up from 34 from new to 39 now. I am hoping it will keep going up to above 40.
If anyone is interested what happens on a long motorway run I did a 160 mile run down the A1 a few days ago. The battery was full when I set off and the ICE was running most of the time on the motorway. The destination was in the satnav and the car "kept back" about 12 miles of battery for the last 10 miles of non-motorway. I was doing about 70-74 MPH all the way using cruise control whenever I could. The battery range on a few occasions went up due to regen (by about 3 miles at one point) but it soon uses this up again by running without the ICE for a bit longer.
On motorway journeys you pretty much can't tell whether the engine is running or not unless you look at the tacometer.
At the end of the journey the MPG was showing 81 and I'm totally happy with that.
Over the full mileage of the car (currently 1,304 miles) is says I've done 896 on battery - 122.8 MPG average - 5.9 miles per kWh.
 

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After a month of ownership my EL range has gone up from 34 from new to 39 now. I am hoping it will keep going up to above 40.
If anyone is interested what happens on a long motorway run I did a 160 mile run down the A1 a few days ago. The battery was full when I set off and the ICE was running most of the time on the motorway. The destination was in the satnav and the car "kept back" about 12 miles of battery for the last 10 miles of non-motorway. I was doing about 70-74 MPH all the way using cruise control whenever I could. The battery range on a few occasions went up due to regen (by about 3 miles at one point) but it soon uses this up again by running without the ICE for a bit longer.
On motorway journeys you pretty much can't tell whether the engine is running or not unless you look at the tacometer.
At the end of the journey the MPG was showing 81 and I'm totally happy with that.
Over the full mileage of the car (currently 1,304 miles) is says I've done 896 on battery - 122.8 MPG average - 5.9 miles per kWh.
This is how I always use my car on longer trips. For trips around town etc I run on pure electric but I also do a lot of motorway miles for work and find I get around half of the miles covered by electric. I usually watch the range myself and if need be, switch manually to Electric mode to make sure I use it all if I can charge at my destination. If I know I can't charge at my destination i try and keep at least 20 miles of electric for the return journey.
 

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I have now had my 250E for 6 months now so have had most of the winter and the best parts of the summer, I totally disagree that temperature has anything
to do with the range you get, I was given 35 electric miles on a charge during the coldest part of winter and have only achieved a maximum of 28 during the recent
hot spell, yes I have been using the air con but also the heater in the winter months, what you get is purely based on what you used and how you drove on your last
few journeys and nothing at all to do with outside temperature.
 

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A250E Saloon Prem Plus
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I have now had my 250E for 6 months now so have had most of the winter and the best parts of the summer, I totally disagree that temperature has anything
to do with the range you get, I was given 35 electric miles on a charge during the coldest part of winter and have only achieved a maximum of 28 during the recent
hot spell, yes I have been using the air con but also the heater in the winter months, what you get is purely based on what you used and how you drove on your last
few journeys and nothing at all to do with outside temperature.
Interesting to hear your experiences - in winter I was getting 35-40 in summer 40-45, always driven same except aircon on in summer.

Overall since purchase (6 months) have been getting 3.9 m kw/h, which tallies with my range.

I agree that driving style makes a big impact, thrash it and you get much less, lots of big hills you also get less.
 

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I have now had my 250E for 6 months now so have had most of the winter and the best parts of the summer, I totally disagree that temperature has anything
to do with the range you get, I was given 35 electric miles on a charge during the coldest part of winter and have only achieved a maximum of 28 during the recent
hot spell, yes I have been using the air con but also the heater in the winter months, what you get is purely based on what you used and how you drove on your last
few journeys and nothing at all to do with outside temperature.
So are you disagreeing with science? The battery cells are most efficient at temps around 15-25deg.

In the winter with heater off, I can squeeze 40+ miles by dropping my speed (60-65mph on motorways), being gentle on acceleration, paying attention to hills, etc. Currently I am getting 45miles consistently despite aircon on, higher speeds on motorways, etc.

The range figures you are quoting - are they the actual distances you are driving from a single charge or what the car is estimating?
 

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The figures are what the car is estimating. I regularly do a 60 mile journey from London to Chichester on comfort mode and at the end of the 65 mile journey I usually achieve 55 miles on electric which is great, however if I did that journey on Electric only I doubt I would get any more than 40 miles. The car is great but the fuel saving benefits only kick in on longer journeys on Comfort or Eco mode, using on electric only is only 30% cheaper than running permanently on the ICE but spending 5.5 hours charging the car up every 2 days for a measly 40 miles is just not worth it, you wouldn't put a gallon of petrol in every 2 days and wait for 5 hours for the tank to fill would you. Despite all this I love the car and am sticking with it.
 

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Are you charging at home? I plug mine in when I pull up on the drive (cable stays out), so takes me about 10 secs to plug in. It then charges by itself over night, doesn't matter if it takes 30 mins or 10 hours. The car is sat idle anyway.

45MPG @ £1.30/l is 13p/mile
4m/kWH (40 mile range) @ 15p/kw is 3.75p/mile. Switch to a supplier with a cheap overnight tariff and it drops to 1.25p/mile.

In 12.5k miles since June last year, I have saved over £600 in fuel by charging up. The saving will increase more now I have switched electric supplier too.
 

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Spot on antnee. To really take advantage of what this car offers you need a home charger. The charging time is not an issue then, plus by getting a good deal with your electric supplier, using an economy 7 tariff and setting your charger to come on overnight at lower rates, a full charge will be a fair bit cheaper than a gallon of petrol/diesel. For me, buying a hybrid was more of a change in philosophy rather than just buying a new car. Driving sensibly, getting a home charger, recharging every day, using route guidance with comfort/eco mode etc. These are all things you have to put into practice, and you'll soon get financial benefits as well as environmental ones 😎 lots of people getting hung up over pure electric range with this car, but there's more to it than that.
 

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For info... these are my lifetime figures over about 15000 miles since last July.... pretty happy with mpg and mpkWh just from doing what I mentioned in my last post, and using all the technology available in the car.
8503
 

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Are you charging at home? I plug mine in when I pull up on the drive (cable stays out), so takes me about 10 secs to plug in. It then charges by itself over night, doesn't matter if it takes 30 mins or 10 hours. The car is sat idle anyway.

45MPG @ £1.30/l is 13p/mile
4m/kWH (40 mile range) @ 15p/kw is 3.75p/mile. Switch to a supplier with a cheap overnight tariff and it drops to 1.25p/mile.

In 12.5k miles since June last year, I have saved over £600 in fuel by charging up. The saving will increase more now I have switched electric supplier too.
I must admit I need to change my set up, I use a standard 3 pin socket to charge mine up and often during the day, my suppliers rates are 21.54 day rate and 12.54 night, I guess I need to always charge at night and on a timer that kicks in at 01:00 when the cheap rate starts.
Also a bit confused how to work out how much it cost to charge, someone said its the battery power i.e. 15.6 kwh X rate which is say 15p kwh = £2.34 but since its kw per hour then that's £2.34 per hour to charge which is obviously wrong.
 

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Usable battery space is just over 10kwh. Cost to charge is simply your unit rate (21.54 or 12.54) mulitplied by 10. You can use 11 as it then accounts for any losses in the charging process though.

If you have smart meters, have a look at Octopus Go or EDF, they have much better rates than you have currently.
 

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Usable battery space is just over 10kwh. Cost to charge is simply your unit rate (21.54 or 12.54) mulitplied by 10. You can use 11 as it then accounts for any losses in the charging process though.

If you have smart meters, have a look at Octopus Go or EDF, they have much better rates than you have currently.
Okay understand that, so the remaining 5.6 kwh is just for all other electrical ancillaries i.e. lights etc and for pulling away when the usable battery space has run out?
 

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It will use a small amount for those things, but its primarily to enhance the battery life. These type of batteries don't like to be fully charged or fully discharged, but the control systems used means that we can't ever do that as there is always some margin left.
 

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Hi all, 1st post here, be nice!

I receive my A250e premium plus saloon company car tomorrow (2nd hand but only 9 months old with 7000 miles on the clock) and I can't wait! Ive watched a ton of videos and read lots of reviews but I can't seem to find anything on real world mpg values.

The claimed wltp figures for the A250e are something like 258 mpg which obviously isn't real life.
What are regular drivers finding they get out of it, providing you charge often and drive relatively sensibly?
I commute to different places every day, each roughly a 100 mile round trip, some more and some less. There is potentially charging at my destination but I can't count on that. The journeys are mostly A roads and then some city for the last 5 miles or so.

Thanks!
 

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Hi all, 1st post here, be nice!

I receive my A250e premium plus saloon company car tomorrow (2nd hand but only 9 months old with 7000 miles on the clock) and I can't wait! Ive watched a ton of videos and read lots of reviews but I can't seem to find anything on real world mpg values.

The claimed wltp figures for the A250e are something like 258 mpg which obviously isn't real life.
What are regular drivers finding they get out of it, providing you charge often and drive relatively sensibly?
I commute to different places every day, each roughly a 100 mile round trip, some more and some less. There is potentially charging at my destination but I can't count on that. The journeys are mostly A roads and then some city for the last 5 miles or so.

Thanks!
hi and welcome to the forum. I did some calculations to explain how the mpg is calculated on a previous post


The mpg figure is also accurate albeit somewhat misleading. It basically writes off the cost of electricity and gives you a figure based on how many miles you travelled using petrol regardless of whether you used electric or not.

Say you travel 50 miles but some miles were done on electric it would give you a figure based on how many gallons of petrol were used regardless of how much electricity was used.

Example -
50 miles travelled
5 miles on petrol
45 miles on electric
1 litre of petrol used
Reported consumption - 227 mpg
 
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